We Don’t Live In La La Land

In the world of "Presentation Perfection", you start your presentation preparation weeks ahead...right?

  • Gather sources
  • Write
  • Re-write
  • Rehearse
  • Video-tape yourself
  • Gear up for a home-run presentation
  • Or fret and worry it's going to be a flop

Unfortunately, we don't live in La-La Land. It won't go smoothly. Something always gets in the way. For me, my greatest weakness and resistance is the research. How about you?

Lack of confidence?

Now your presentation is in 3 days, and you're officially in Hustle Land:

  • Presentation finished
  • Slides organized
  • Rehearsed once
  • We do what we can, right?

For many, there's a lot on the line in these presentations: funding, influence, new clients, and respect. For example, my architect clients could potentially close a deal in the millions...with the right presentation. 

What if I told you there are some super simple “tricks of the trade” you can implement that will add 5 minutes to your preparation, but makes a huge difference?

Before any athlete, musician, dancer, actor, martial artist and even some surgeons make their way onto the stage or operating room, they warm-up. For them, It's not an option to forgo that step. This list of professionals live by practice, preparation and warm-up.

Warm-up connotes physical exercise. So let’s say instead: they create a pre-performance sequence or ritual.

You should have one too.

I'm 100% convinced having and doing a pre-performance sequence improves your delivery. That's why its a core component of my program.

After reading, Psyched Up: How the Science of Mental Preparation Can Help You Succeed, by Daniel McGinn, I'm %110 certain it works. In his book, McGinn sites numerous studies in sports, corporations and the military that proves this point. Listen to Daniel Pink on his 1. 3. 20 Podcast interview Daniel McGinn.

By creating your own pre-performance sequence and using it every time, you essentially anchor in a known method for relaxing, energizing and aligning yourself to a greater purpose and worthwhile outcome...all components of a readiness to perform.

Remember: this isn't just for a presentation. You can use your ritual for a company meeting, an interview or conference where you want to make contact with potential clients.

Here are some ideas for your pre-performance procedure. Choose the ones that make you feel grounded, excited and calmer.

  1. Do something physical. Stretch, shake, jump. Be sure to add a couple deep breaths to this one.
  2. Your voice needs attention. Hum. Sing. Say "peanut butter and jelly" 10 times very fast.
  3. Listen to uplifting music. Pick your favorite.
  4. Wear the outfit that makes you feel like a star.
  5. Tell your colleague a story about a time when you felt successful. (say aloud if you are alone so you can hear you've been a champion before.)
  6. Have a "go-to" intention, prayer or quote that generates the big picture of why are sharing your ideas with an audience.
  7. Put that lucky coin, pen, stone _____(fill in the blank) in your pocket.

Find out what works for you, and let me know! You can reply to this email.

It may be a trial and error at first, but once you have your pre-performance sequence, repeat it consistently.


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